From the floor walk carpark head down the track to the river bridge. Over millennium the mighty Leven River has carved deep groves into the rock which are clearly visible  zig-zaging under you feet. Once you have crossed the bridge continue on the track to the right which heads away from the river along large rock formations blanketed in ferns and moss until once again you hear the roar of the river at the splits where the water squeezes through the rugged canyon walls. Continuing along the river you look up to the point of the cliff to see the silhouette of the Devils Head. A further 5 minutes walk bring you to the devils elbow with a perfect spot to sit and enjoy the view of the breathtaking fold lines and if you look really closely you can spot the Lookout almost 1000 ft above.  Total walk 1.5 hour return steep terrain and steps.

The Leven Splits
Leven Canyon Lookout

Leven Canyons one of Tasmania’s most easily accessed geological monuments.

A detective story under your feet.

The lookout platform offers panoramic views of the surrounding countryside.
Standing on the platform you feel inspired by the dramatic cliff formation of the canyon and the sheer ridge opposite the lookout. On clear days to the north the waters of Bass Strait can be seen.
The Leven River is fed by the highland rain and snow falls from the Black Bluff ranges. Dominating the skyline at (1,339 m) the Black range runs north south with the dramatic bluff on the northern end featuring Winterbrook Falls, where the winter snow melt cascades 200m over the rock escarpment.
The River continues to carve it’s way through the hills to Taylors Flats (see map in carpark) where the river is calm before it runs through a deep and spectacular gorge into the sedimentary rocks, exposing a continuous section passing through limestone, sandstone, conglomerate and older Cambrian sediments. Over 350 million years ago everything was deformed and folded on a grand scale. More recently with glacial action (1 million year ago) the landscape was taking modern form. All this upheaval lifted Griffiths ridge to it’s present day height of 300m above the river.
Thousands of years ago a landslip from the sheer ridge opposite the lookout (Griffiths Ridge), fell and blocked the flow of the river. How many tons of rock and soil? (Walk to the Devils Elbow to get a closer look) This caused the valley of Loongana to fill, forming a lake. Over time the river forged a new path through the rock, draining the lake and re-routing the river along what has become a new section of gorge. The river rushes through the narrow Leven Splits then onto the Devils Elbow where it does a ninety-degree turn around the landslip. Continuing straight below the lookout the river drops in two waterfalls approximately 11 meters and flows through Gunns Plains, Ulverstone to Bass Strait.

‘The Leven River thus entrenched itself in the route created after the floods of basalt. Today, it (the Leven River) finds itself in a giant valley with spectacular ravines it could never produce with modern flows. The river carries this same message of a grander past all the way to the sea . . . " – Tasmanian geologist Doc David Leaman.

Leven Canyon Floor Walk Bridge

From the lookout you can return (taking approx 30min) to the carpark through the forest stairs. Featuring 697 steps down thorough lush ferns you are lead to the lower cliff lookout, which is at the planning stages through Central Coast Council. From here continue through the fern walk which features a dazzling array of man ferns up to 7m tall back to the carpark.
Drive out of the carpark and continue approx 1km down Loongana Road to the.....

Above is a picture of Lesley at the Leven Canyon Lookout  that is only a 20 min return walk and has fantastic views of the Leven River winding it's way through a limestone gulch nearly 1000 ft below. The lookout platform offers panoramic views of the surrounding countryside. Standing on the platform you feel inspired by the dramatic cliff formation of the canyon and the sheer ridge opposite the lookout. On clear days to the north the waters of Bass Strait can be seen.

The Devils Head
Lesley on the Leven Canyon Lookout
View from the soon to be completed Lower Cliff Lookout
Small bridge at the base of the Forest Stairs
Fern Walk
Relaxing at the Devils Elbow
Native Trigger Plant at the Devils Elbow in September
Walking down the Canyon Floor Walk
Canyon Floor Walk Bridge
The view from the Devils Elbow
A view worth framing

Directly beneath the lookout the river drops in two waterfalls. At present there is no real track to view them but if your brave enough you can always try to see them the way the guy in the picture above is! For youtube footage of various kayaks going over the two falls click the link below. 

Leven Canyon Waterfalls